Racial Differences in Nursing Home Experiences

By Robert J. Griffore, Lillian A. Phenice and Lori A. Post.

Published by The International Journal of Health, Wellness and Society

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Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

This study aims to examine racial differences on health, medical and functional characteristics of residents of nursing homes, as well as their satisfaction with nursing home care and the satisfaction of family informants. Data were collected from a random general population survey of individuals with a relative in Michigan nursing homes. White family informants were more satisfied than black family informants with the care their family member was receiving. Number of activities of daily living that could be performed was not related to race, with the exception of eating, where a higher percentage of more whites could perform this ADL. There were no racial differences on health problems, except for Alzheimer’s disease, which was reported for a higher percentage of blacks than whites. Satisfaction of white nursing home residents, as reported by family informants, was negatively correlated with number of ADLs that could be performed, and with number of health problems. It was also correlated with the satisfaction of the informant. Satisfaction of black nursing home residents, as reported by family informants, was not correlated with number of health problems or number of ADLs that could be performed. It was correlated with the satisfaction of the informant.

Keywords: Race, Nursing Homes, ADL, Health Problems, Medical Problems

The International Journal of Health, Wellness and Society, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp.107-116. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 723.347KB).

Dr. Robert J. Griffore

Professor, Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA

Robert J. Griffore is Professor in the Michigan State University College of Social Science, Department of Human Development and Family Studies. Current research is focused on human development, gerontology, and families.

Dr. Lillian A. Phenice

Professor, Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA

Lillian A. Phenice is a Professor in the Michigan State University College of Social Science, Department of Human Development and Family Studies. Current research is focused on human development, gerontology, and families.

Dr. Lori A. Post

Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA

Lori A. Post is an Associate Professor at the Yale School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine. Her area of expertise is intentional injury prevention.