Understanding Employee Wellbeing Practices in Australian Organizations

By Grace McCarthy, Shamika Almeida and Julia Ahrens.

Published by The International Journal of Health, Wellness and Society

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Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Research has shown that employee well-being is associated with a range of
positive outcomes such as reduced stress and improved productivity. The aim of
this study was to assess the awareness of Australian HR Managers of a broader
range of concepts related to wellbeing and of the nature and prevalence of
well-being programs in Australian organisations. An email invitation was sent to
3471 HR professionals in Australia of whom 319 responded to the online survey
(9.2%). Findings indicate that Australian HR professionals offer a range of
services related to emotional, intellectual, social and physical well-being, but
only a minority include services related to spiritual well-being. Most
respondents consider that the benefits of well-being programs outweigh the
costs. However, the low response rate may suggest that many organisations do not
yet recognise the importance of promoting well-being at work.

Keywords: Well-being, Australia, Organisational Wellbeing, HRM Practices, Employee Well-being

The International Journal of Health, Wellness and Society, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp.181-198. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 795.073KB).

Dr. Grace McCarthy

Senior Lecturer, Sydney Business School, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia

Dr. Grace McCarthy is a Senior Lecturer at Sydney Business School, University of Wollongong, coordinating the Master of Business Coaching and researching wellbeing in business, coaching, virtual teams, and education. Grace worked for many years in a multinational manufacturing company and has a keen interest in how academic theories can be applied in the real world.

Dr. Shamika Almeida

University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia

Dr. Julia Ahrens

University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia