Food Consumption: Contributions from the Largest Companies in Brazil

By Maria Fernanda Elias and Sonia Tucunduva Philippi.

Published by The International Journal of Health, Wellness and Society

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: May 30, 2014 $US5.00

The World Health Organization (WHO) established measures directed at the food industry, emphasizing the role of the private sector in the achievement of health goals and confrontation of chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCDs). Thus, it is critical to understand the relative contributions of the various food industries to the population’s diet. This work describes what companies contribute to the main sales of packaged food in Brazil and presents an overview of the food industry. We used descriptive statistics to examine packaged food company shares provided by Euromonitor, an international independent market analysis company. Packaged foods include baby food, bakery goods, canned food, refrigerated processed food, pastries, dairy products, dehydrated food, frozen processed food, ice cream, meal supplements, instant noodles, oils and fats, pasta, ready meals, sauces, spices, soups, sweet and non-sweet snacks, and cereal bars. The results show that the packaged food market is highly fragmented within Brazil. The top ten companies account for 32.4% of total sales and include seven multinational companies (Nestlé, Kraft Foods, Unilever, Danon, Pepsico, Bunge, and Brf Brasil Foods). Each company ranked eighth or lower contributed less than 2% of the total market. Strategic actions of the leading market companies result in models and examples that should be followed by smaller companies whose incomes limit broader investments. Given that seven out of the ten largest companies in Brazil operate globally, their actions might affect the models of food industrialization and commercialization at the local level even more significantly by focusing on the formulation of products with nutritional profiles that meet the goals of the WHO.

Keywords: Food Industry, Food Consumption, Packaged Foods

The International Journal of Health, Wellness and Society, Volume 4, Issue 1, May 2014, pp.51-59. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: May 30, 2014 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 379.375KB)).

Maria Fernanda Elias

Doctoral Student, Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

Maria Fernanda Elias, MS, PhD, graduated with a degree in nutrition & dietetics from the University of São Paulo—USP (Brazil), holds a master’s degree in nutrition & public health from the same university, and has a degree in marketing from the School of Advertising & Marketing (ESPM—São Paulo). She is working on her PhD in applied human nutrition at the University of São Paulo, with a research project focused on food consumption evaluation. Her main areas of expertise are human nutrition and health and nutrition communication.

Sonia Tucunduva Philippi

Professor and Researcher, Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

Dr. Sonia Tucunduva Philippi is a professor and researcher in the Department of Nutrition in the School of Public Health at the University of São Paulo—USP (Brazil). She graduated with a degree in nutrition & dietetics from the University of São Paulo, and she holds a master’s degree and a PhD in public health from the same university. Dr. Sonia is a member of the editorial board for scientific journals and is a referee, has published 13 books, and has developed professional software for nutritional analysis. She is also responsible for the Brazilian food guide pyramid. Her main areas of expertise are human nutrition and health, public health, food composition, and nutritional guides.