The Effects of Stress on Eating Patterns

By Amanda Stillar and Michael Emond.

Published by The International Journal of Health, Wellness and Society

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Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

It is well established that stress is related to changes in eating patterns. The individual differences model has been widely used to examine the effects of stress on eating behavior in experimental settings. Common trends for gender, dietary restraint, and BMI have been established. The current study investigates the effects of stress on eating patterns in everyday living, while also examining the role of individual differences: gender, dietary restraint, and BMI. Results support past findings that stress leads to changes in food consumption, increase preference for salty flavors, and increased preference for take-out food options. Findings also show evidence that gender significantly influences stress-related eating patterns with regard to frequency of snacking and loss of control over eating. Collectively, findings provide valuable information for health care professionals and suggest potential key targets for stress-related food consumption interventions.

Keywords: Stress-eating, Stress-eating Patterns, Stress-related Food Preferences

The International Journal of Health, Wellness and Society, Volume 4, Issue 3-4, May 2015, pp.35-46. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 586.489KB).

Amanda Stillar

Clinical Psychology Graduate Student, Psychology Department, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Michael Emond

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada