Modifying the Theory of Planned Behavior to Predict Children’s Exercise Behaviors

By Melissa Wigginton, Jerry Lee, Helen Hopp Marshak and Kiti Freier.

Published by The International Journal of Health, Wellness and Society

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published Online: April 29, 2016 $US5.00

A modified Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) (Ajzen 1991) was applied to predict children’s exercise behaviors and determine if the constructs attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control (PBC) directly predict children’s exercise behaviors better than intention. We also examined whether body mass index, socioeconomic status, age, gender, past exercise behaviors, and planning improved prediction of children’s exercise behaviors. Children (N=345) ages eight to fourteen years participated in the study. Attitude, subjective norm, and PBC were found to significantly predict 25.4% of the variance in children’s exercise (p < .001). Intention was not a significant predictor, contributing less than 1% to the prediction of children’s exercise behaviors. The modified model was found to have a significantly better fit (Z (345) = 3.11, p = .002), in that it predicted 9.7% more variance in children’s physical activity than the original TPB model.

Keywords: Physical Activity, Adolescents, Health, Obesity, Planning

The International Journal of Health, Wellness and Society, Volume 6, Issue 2, June 2016, pp.57-71. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published Online: April 29, 2016 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 826.431KB)).

Dr. Melissa Wigginton

Assistant Professor, College of Health Science, California Baptist University, Highland, California, USA

Dr. Jerry Lee

Professor, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, USA

Dr. Helen Hopp Marshak

Associate Professor, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, USA

Dr. Kiti Freier

Professor, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, USA