Tai Chi’s Potential for Improving the Health Status of Informal Caregivers

By Andi Céline Martin and Darren Candow.

Published by The International Journal of Health, Wellness and Society

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Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

At some point in time, most people will be in the position of having to provide informal care for an ill loved one. Research suggests that informal caregivers experience poor physical health and well-being and that decreased participation in regular physical activity may be one contributing factor. Novel forms of physical activity, categorized as mind-body medicines, have gained popularity due to their incorporation of the pillars of health-related fitness (cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength and endurance, and flexibility). Currently, one of the most widely used physical activities categorized as a mind-body medicine is tai chi, which has shown promise for improving several aspects of physical functioning. This brief review will highlight the potential beneficial effects of tai chi and mind-body medicine on the health outcome measures of informal caregivers.

Keywords: Informal Caregiving, Tai Chi, Mind-body Medicine, Physical Activity

The International Journal of Health, Wellness and Society, Volume 6, Issue 4, December 2016, pp.35-50. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 773.528KB).

Andi Céline Martin

PhD Candidate, Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Dr. Darren Candow

Associate Professor, Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Gerontology Graduate Coordinator, Centre on Aging and Health, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada